An Herbalist’s Toolbox: a good knife

I made it home to America (specifically, New Mexico) for Christmas with my family. It had been eleven years since we had celebrated Christmas together. My daughters and I came prepared with Christmas gifts in tow, ready to wrap and put under the tree.

We hadn’t seen our family in six years. A lot changes in that amount of time and it wasn’t easy picking out gifts. Luckily, some of my family had given me a list of items they would enjoy. I am not one to make a list for gifts (if you’re reading this, mum, a lot has changed since I was ten). My sister told me that she had absolutely no idea what to get for me. But when I opened her gifts to me, each one was better than the last. She rocked it!

One of the gifts she gave me was this beautiful knife. Every herbalist needs a good knife…one that can cut up roots. This baby does the trick really well. It is beautiful and strong and feels good in the hand even after a basket full of burdock root.

A special thanks to my sister, Misha, for being such a generous and creative gift giver and adding to my Herbalist’s Toolbox.

From the Flotsam and Fork website:

“These carbon steel and boxwood kitchen knives are made by hand in a workshop in Solsona, Spain, near Barcelona, where the Pallarès family has been making knives and blades since 1917.

The carbon steel blade is lightweight, and will hold it’s edge longer than a typical stainless-steel blade. It will develop a lovely patina with use.

Care: Keep the blade dry to prevent rust from forming on the blade. Wipe with a soft cloth after hand washing.”

3 Comments on “An Herbalist’s Toolbox: a good knife

  1. My Corona pruning shears that were actually made in Corona were a gift from my Pa when I graduated high school in 1985, and they are still my favorite, even though I no longer use them.

    Like

  2. Thanks for sharing your lovely moment. Seeing your blog, I remember a memorable moment. When I was fifteen, my father gave me a nice knife. Because I loved the knife a lot.

    Like

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